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The Stand-in

presented by Curro Novallas Language: Spanish

It is the year 2051. Julio, a cellular engineer, is about to leave the Earth on a working journey, never to return. To keep his wife and employer happy, he creates a clone - Julio 2.0. However, before the departure, Julio 2.0 tells Julio and his wife that he will continue to do Julio's job but the marriage is over.

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3 comments
5.0 Stars
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3 comments

Comment_dan_profile_b_w
Dan Solo

Genius... Loved it.

Asks all the right questions.
over 1 year ago
Comment_211643_653311928_187899122_n
Curro Novallas

Thanks!

Thank you, Dan. Really glad you liked it. Happy 2013!
over 1 year ago
Comment_peter_studio_two
Peter Solomon

Straight Queer?

*SPOILER* In "The Explanation" (2005) and "The Stand In" (2011) Curro Novallas has crafted two stylish films that deal with relationship, identity, and what it is to encounter the "other". By "the other" I mean what it is to confront anything or anyone other than the male self, who by virtue of birth is broadly expected to be socially detached, along with intellectually and sexually free to do as one wishes. Are these two films rough equivalents to the mid career work of Pedro Almodovar; and indeed, can Novallas be seen as a kind of "straight Almodovar"? I expect Mr Novallas would decidedly think not. However, the suggestion is worth considering, given the domination of Catholicism in Spanish culture, and how this branch of Christianity has always had something punishing to say about "otherness". Central male characters in "The Explanation" and "The Stand in" are uniformly heard to tell "their other" that they have fallen out of love. And arguably, in their confusion and guilt they have also misplaced the ability to love themselves. In "The Stand In" Novallas introduces a dialectic debate about religion versus science, which he seems to conflate with a moral discussion about the self versus the other. However, there are no answers to be found here, as the filmmaker seems ill-equipped to integrate his disparate selves. Perhaps this is why Novallas ends his film with graphics that recall medical illustrations: neither one biological side is complete without the other, and yet to attempt integration is strictly forbidden (by the church).
about 1 year ago

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